Monday, August 26, 2013

August 26 Weekly Challenge

Harvest
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The word "harvest" needs little explanation.
We often think of the word only in terms of autumn,
but think how much is harvested in mid- to late-summer.

Flowers come and go all summer long . . . and
parts of my veggie garden have already been picked and eaten.

I love vintage fruit and vegetable labels.


[source
The Harvest Moon has been used by hardworking farmers since 
the beginning of time to extend their workday.


[source
Those mischievous squirrels begin harvesting for the winter 
any time they find a prize nut. Do you think they remember
all of their hiding places?


[source
Harvest colors are traditionally warm and comforting. But
I like the bright splash of blue in this abstract painting of harvest time.


Did you know there is a Harvest Mouse?


[source
Ripe for picking. Maybe these will become a luscious wine.



Sometimes a crop just gets a bit out of hand . . .
[source
As summer draws to a close, what sort of images do you think of
when you hear the word "harvest"?

We hope you'll take the challenge this week and
show us what "Harvest" brings to mind!
You have until Sunday, September 1.
As always, link up with Mr. Linky below, leave us a comment,
and please link back to Inspiration Avenue in your blog post.

Don't forget to sign up for the Altered Postcard Swap!
Read all the details in the post right below this one.

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Thursday, August 22, 2013

Join the 2013 Altered Postcard Swap!


The Inspiration Avenue 
Altered Postcard Swap
This Altered Postcard Swap is closed, 
but stay tuned for more swaps and other events
in future! Also stop back for an upcoming post on the
cards that were sent in the swap! 
 
We had so much fun last year with our Postcard Swap, we've been
planning to do it again . . . this time with a slight variation:
This will be a swap of altered postcards.

 [source]

Do you have some vintage or new postcards lying around?
Why not give them new life and inspiration,
share them with others, and make some new artistic friends!

[source]

Start with an actual postcard, and let your creative expression run free!

[source]

The only rules are:
  1. Each piece must start with an actual postcard. Make 3 altered cards.

  2. Use both the front and the back of the card if you can.
  3. Email your snail mail address to IAalteredpostcardswap@gmail.com so we
    can match you up with 3 other participants.
  4. When mailing, post 
in an envelope or package of some kind in order 
to protect the piece.
  5. Have your altered postcards mailed by September 21, 2013

 Read below for all the details!





 Here's how to sign up:
Sign ups start now and will be open until midnight September 5, 2013.
(That's Eastern Time, see our clocks in the right sidebar)
Leave a comment on this post just to say Yes! I'm interested!


Then, send your snail mail address to
IAalteredpostcardswap@gmail.com
(Sending your info to this email address instead of posting in the comment section
will ensure that spammers will NOT see your address.
And, we at IA will NEVER, EVER use your address
for anything but this postcard swap.)

Start creating 3 altered postcards that you'd love to mail to someone special.
 They must start with an actual postcard 
(can be a vintage card or a more recent one),
but how you alter each card is up to you.
You may want to keep in mind the thickness/weight 
of any embellishments you add since you will be
mailing them, so design accordingly.

Remember! We are a global community so you may be
sending a postcard or two overseas.

 

Soon after September 5, you will receive 3
names and addresses of the recipients of your postcards.
The addresses will be emailed to you at the address you emailed us from.
Mail your 3 altered postcards by September 21, 2013.

Please grab our Altered Swap button in the right sidebar
(whether you participate or not) and display in your sidebar!
We'd be so grateful if you would help spread the word!


Thank you so much!
We hope you will join the swap!

Leave a comment on this post to let us know you are interested, 
then send your snail mail address to:
IAalteredpostcardswap@gmail.com

~ Maggie


Monday, August 19, 2013

Weekly Art Challenge-Post Cards

Happy Monday everyone!  For this week's challenge, I thought we could focus on postcards.  In fact, later in the week we'll unveil a special postcard-related swap so stay tuned!

Postcards were a common way to communicate with someone far away at very little cost.  They were often used for advertising purposes.
They were certainly cheap to mail.  Remember penny postcards?   For those of us who didn't want to write long letters, the space seemed just right, though I never quite had enough room.
Source
As a child, every time I took a trip somewhere there would be postcards to purchase.  Hotels and motels even had free ones to advertise their locations.   I remember sending a postcard to a friend, then returning home before their postcard arrived in the mail.  I guess my trips were always too short.

From Dover Publications
 Often postcards have a humorous message. 


There are lots of postcards with a specific theme that have no written message.


Wackystuff on Flickr

 I'm often drawn to the vintage postcards featuring performers or people in fun costumes.  This one looks like a hand-tinted photograph of a dancer.
Lots of vintage postcards remind us of past fashion trends and capture vignettes of people and what was important in their lives.


 Some postcards are just plain pretty, with images of flowers.


And of course, we must not forget the importance of holiday postcards. 
Source

Postcards come in various sizes, but the most common size seems to be 4 x 6 inches.  So for this challenge you can create a 4x6 postcard of your own.  If you'd like some postcards to work from, you can download them here.  It can be funny, pretty, silly, romantic, reminiscent of a place or event, or just about anything you can imagine.  Link up your postcard no later than noon EST on Sunday, August 25.  Be sure to leave a comment after you post.  And check back later this week for the information on the swap.  It's going to be a fun one!
See you soon,
Lou Anne
aka Misplaced Mermaid

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Monday, August 12, 2013

This week our challenge is ~Native Arts~

Native Arts
There is such a diverse 
amount of Indian art and it is Beautiful!

Source


Source

Source

A little bit of info I found interesting
NATIVE AMERICAN DESIGNS AND COLORS                  

The People: Native American Legacy
Native Americans decorated most of their crafts to make them more beautiful. They added color and designs with paint, beads, quill embroidery, and by carving and weaving. Sometimes a design or color was a symbol, that is, it stood for an idea or told a story. For example, among the Crow, the color black was a symbol for victory; arrow symbols might mean a hunt or a battle.
Each group had its own set of meanings for colors and designs to use on ceremonial crafts. These symbols could be drawn on a leather pouch or a drumskin to retell a myth or relate an important event Sometimes the maker of a ghost shirt or some other ceremonial object had a dream that revealed what design to use.
The decorative art on many everyday objects had no special meaning. Sometimes a geometric design might be called "butterfly" because the triangle shapes together on a basket looked like a butterfly. Usually, the only way to find out if a design was supposed to be a symbol with meaning was to ask the maker. Designs that showed people, birds, and animals were usually created by men. Women worked more with geometric shapes.
Color was important to add meaning to a design, too. Most Native Americans named four points of the earth, the four directions of the compass--north, south, east, and west--and assigned a color to each one. Among the Cherokee, north was blue, south was white, east was red, and west was black. Colors could also mean life or death, wax or peace, female or male, night or day. For example, the Navaho thought black represented men and blue, women. The Hopi thought that the color blue was the most sacred and used it to honor their gods. Here are some of the other meanings attached to colors:

Color Meaning for Native Americans
Black night, underworld, male, cold, disease, death
Blue sky, water, female, clouds, lightning, moon, thunder, sadness
Green plant life, earth, summer, rain
Red wounds, sunset, thunder, blood, earth, war, day
White winter, death, snow
Yellow sunshine, day, dawn

 Source





Oh I could got a bit carried away with so many neat and different forms of Native art.

This is famous art 
piece by the famous C. Allen Johnson
Direction are on the Right Sidebar!!
It is easy and it is Fun
Come play along!
~Shel IA Team member



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Monday, August 5, 2013

Fun, Easy, Excellent Crafts

When I come across a craft idea or recipe that seems like it would be fun to create, and not too difficult, it is saved on the computer as a "to do".  Do you have a craft TO DO list?  If not, then why not?

Let's share a few crafty goodness things  with one another.  After you share your little gems, be it your own, or even if purloined from Pinterest or elsewhere, just link it below so everyone on Inspiration Avenue can also join in the fun.

Here are a few ideas to get you started:

Making terrific clothes pins (magnets for the refrigerator or just to hold your strappy camisoles).  Go here to get the supply list and know-how!

This gem of a how-to comes to us courtesy of Corazon:
 *** (try grapefruit, lemons and limes for varying colours and sizes) with a sharp paring knife slice four large round oranges slightly less than 1/4 inch. dare for slender, the thinner the slice the more stained glass like when dry, too thin and they may curl during drying. too thick and you will not have the orange rich clarity of kissing the sun. place each slice of orange on a paper towel to absorb the juices i decided to place my round slices on metal cooling racks and slide them into the oven, lots of circulation to help them dry. one hour at 275* two hours at 225* i chose to turn my slices every half hour for even drying. be sure your slices do not over lap or they will dry misshapen for some of the slices i carefully patted cinnamon on one side, the aroma of citrus and cinnamon, close to nirvana! *** source
And how about making some shrink dinks?  This site tells you how to do it.  Here are a few I made and used as stitch markers:

This recipe looks scrumptious!  Forget the calories and just make it.

Link up with Mr. Linky and show us what you like.  It could be something you have made, or just want to try in the future.  And remember to post the specific URL site below.

We look forward to seeing what you share!

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